Life of Japanese Women in Ukiyo-e

Saturday, April 6, 2019-Sunday, May 26, 2019
※Some works will be replaced during the exhibition period.

Kitagawa Utamaro, The Know-it-all, from the series "A Parent's Moralizing Spectacles", c.1801-04,
Tokyo Metropolitan Edo-Tokyo Museum
【Exhibition period:April 6-May 1】

Kitagawa Utamaro, Mother and Daughter Preparing Raw Fish, c.1789-1801,
Prefectural Museum of Cultural History
【Exhibition period:April 6-May 1】

Kaigetsudō Ando, Standing Beauty Color on silk , 1704-16,
Public Interest Incorporated Foundation, Tekisuiken Cultural Fandation
【Exhibition period:May 3-May 26】

Utagawa Toyokuni III, Utagawa Kunihisa II,
Owarichō, from the series "One Hundred Beautiful Women at Famous Places in Edo", 1858,
Tokyo Metropolitan Edo-Tokyo Museum
【Exhibition period:April 6-May 1】

Utagawa Hiroshige, Utagawa Toyokuni III,
Shinagawa, from the series "The Fifty-three Stations [of the Tōkaidō Road] by Two Brushes", 1854
Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Cultural History
【Exhibition period:May 3-May 26】

Keisai Eisen, Board Game for the Promotion of a Young Lady's Home Education, New Edition, 1843-47,
Tokyo Metropolitan Edo-Tokyo Museum

Utagawa Toyokuni III,Utagawa Kunihisa II,
Tameike , from the series "One Hundred Beautiful Women at Famous Places in Edo", 1858,
Kumon Institute of Education
【Exhibition period:May 3-May 26】

Kitagawa Utamaro, Poem of the Pillow (Utamakura),1788,
Uragami Mitsuru collection
【Exhibition period:April 24-May 9】

When it comes to the women who are depicted in ukiyo-e, the first thing that springs to mind is perhaps bijinga—pictures of beauties. Certainly, women of the Edo period were a source of appreciation and the subject of beautiful visual representations. However, such women also had their own lives and lifestyles. In the social system of the period, which differs from our own, women from a diverse range of social strata—nobles, samurai, farmers, artisans, merchants, and sex workers—each carried on with their daily lives.
Through an assortment of visual and textual records, this exhibition will explore the “lives” of the women who lived during the Edo period, considering what they wore, what they learned, how they worked, how they amused themselves, and how they built families.

This exhibition is arranged into ten thematic sections, which are considered from the perspective of such extant objects as bijinga, clothing, toiletries, shunga (erotic pictures), moral training texts, and foreign travel records.

Information

Duration Saturday, April 6, 2019-Sunday, May 26, 2019
※Some works will be replaced during the exhibition period.
AdmissionGeneral: 1,000 yen (800 yen); University Students: 800 yen
(640 yen); High-School Students/Seniors 60 and Older: 500 yen (400 yen); Elementary/Junior-High-School Students: 100 yen (80 yen)
*Numbers inside parentheses ( ) are admission fees for groups of ten or more and for Shibuya residents.
*Elementary and junior-high-school students are admitted free of charge on Saturdays, Sundays, and national holidays.
*Shibuya residents are admitted free of charge on Fridays.
*Persons with disabilities and up to one attendant are admitted free of charge.
ClosedMondays (except for April 29 and May 6), April 23, May 2 and May 7.
Organized by: The Shoto Museum of Art